What Makes a Good Book?

What makes a good book? The question is enormously subjective. There are a lot of different styles out there and a lot of different tastes.

If you read a book that a bunch of people have raved about, but you hate it, what conclusion do you draw? Do you decide the book is junk and everyone needs to know that? Do you go onto the web and tell everyone you can how awful it was?

If a lot of people say they liked it, do you assume they are lying?

Or do you think maybe other people look for something different in a book? Maybe your taste is not the same as everyone else in the world? After all, even the big NY publishers put out books that have one star reviews on Amazon. Someone believed it was a good book!

But some books are just objectively bad. Right?

This is a question I’m becoming more and more interested in. So tell me, what are your standards for a book? Is it different depending on the genre? (Do you judge an airport thriller with the same standard as a literary classic?) What factors influence whether you love a book and want to tell everyone you know to read it or whether you hate a book so much that you have to warn everyone that it will ruin their life if they read it?

Do Men Read?

Okay, that’s not really a fair question.

I know that men read. I listen to the Sword and Laser podcast and hear both men and women talking about science fiction and fantasy they’ve enjoyed.

But do men read love stories? And, if so, do they read them for the same reasons women do?

The reason I ask is that this company was started with the plan to accept and publish books with romantic heroes that women would find very appealing. However, we’ve received more than one inquiry from a man who has written a book focused on making an appealing heroine, a woman that they find sexy.

We’re not sure whether to expand into accepting these works.

I’ve always heard that men are more visual and more interested in video than in reading. I’ve been told that women read romance for the fantasy of it, to dream of men beyond the realm of the possible, but that men watch things to get the same effect.

Would men be interested in books catered to them with female love interests designed to be particularly appealing to men?

Would lesbians be interested in books with heterosexual relationships, but with female love interests who are played up more?

It’s difficult to explain what I mean by this! What difference does it make?

In most of the books we have, the point of view is mostly the woman’s as she looks for or is suddenly mixed up in love. The heroines are women we can relate to and their love interests are men that we wish we were dating.

What I’m looking at doing is acquiring books that are still love stories but from a more masculine point of view where it is the female who is a little…shinier than real life.

So, pipe up, men! Is this something you would like to see? Please let me know in comments, by email, on FB. Anywhere!